The Seat of Sweet Music's Throne

sierra-crossing:

rylutz:

Nature; the most beautiful and serene is often the most ruthless and destructive

Greg!

ouijasexting:

im fucking crYIN G omfg

cancerously:

treasurewisesilliness:

This is Japan in a nutshell.  Forget all the crazy stuff with the weird tv programs and the cosplaying—that’s just the outer shell that gets attention because it’s unusual.  This, this is the beauty of the country.  I’ve had little grandmothers chase me down because I dropped my shinkansen tickets.  In amusement parks, the attendants do their upmost to get lost items (usually cardigans or kids’ shoes) back to the owners—before the owners even realize they’d lost said item(s). I’ve had complete strangers not only give my thorough directions but have offered to drive me to the place I needed to go.
It is so, so, so hard to go back to the States after you get the J-treatment. I mean, Japan has its downside (“What is this madness you call pizza???”), but the general attitudes of everyone—even the so-called hardcore yankees (two of whom who, on a blazing summer day, helped me find one of my schools when I was heinously lost in the labyrinth that is the neighborhood in which said school is located)—is the epitome of the mindset that I wish everyone would adopt. Because yelling at people gets you nowhere. And being able to empathize with people kinda helps make this country a really nice place to live in.

Okay, I don’t usually add on to posts, but let me tell you a story.
Back in 2008 I traveled to Japan with my high school, and because it was the 20 year anniversary of our “sister city” partnership, the mayor of our sister city paid for our entire group to go to Tokyo Disney Sea. We were all elated, got in when the park opened, rushed to do everything we could.
Well, there’s a little ride near the front of their Tomorrowland where you ride around on a little rollercoaster-style pod. Kind of like bumper cars meets the disney tea cup ride but it’s also in water. It’s wicked fun and even though it was November, my friends and I were all willing to go on. One of my friends was wearing a scarf her host family had knitted for her, and on one of the turns of the ride, it flew off her neck and we watched in horror as it drifted across the water and got sucked under another pod carrying people.
We get to the end of the ride and explain to the attendants what happened, and as soon as she lets slip it’s from family, they all but rocket into action. They shut down the whole ride, and not only did they get the scarf out of the machinery, they blow-dried it for us so she could wear it again. It was freaking remarkable.
People in Japan are hella nice, yo. It meant a lot then, and even 5 years later, it still means a lot now. 

cancerously:

treasurewisesilliness:

This is Japan in a nutshell.  Forget all the crazy stuff with the weird tv programs and the cosplaying—that’s just the outer shell that gets attention because it’s unusual.  This, this is the beauty of the country.  I’ve had little grandmothers chase me down because I dropped my shinkansen tickets.  In amusement parks, the attendants do their upmost to get lost items (usually cardigans or kids’ shoes) back to the owners—before the owners even realize they’d lost said item(s). I’ve had complete strangers not only give my thorough directions but have offered to drive me to the place I needed to go.

It is so, so, so hard to go back to the States after you get the J-treatment. I mean, Japan has its downside (“What is this madness you call pizza???”), but the general attitudes of everyone—even the so-called hardcore yankees (two of whom who, on a blazing summer day, helped me find one of my schools when I was heinously lost in the labyrinth that is the neighborhood in which said school is located)—is the epitome of the mindset that I wish everyone would adopt. Because yelling at people gets you nowhere. And being able to empathize with people kinda helps make this country a really nice place to live in.

Okay, I don’t usually add on to posts, but let me tell you a story.

Back in 2008 I traveled to Japan with my high school, and because it was the 20 year anniversary of our “sister city” partnership, the mayor of our sister city paid for our entire group to go to Tokyo Disney Sea. We were all elated, got in when the park opened, rushed to do everything we could.

Well, there’s a little ride near the front of their Tomorrowland where you ride around on a little rollercoaster-style pod. Kind of like bumper cars meets the disney tea cup ride but it’s also in water. It’s wicked fun and even though it was November, my friends and I were all willing to go on. One of my friends was wearing a scarf her host family had knitted for her, and on one of the turns of the ride, it flew off her neck and we watched in horror as it drifted across the water and got sucked under another pod carrying people.

We get to the end of the ride and explain to the attendants what happened, and as soon as she lets slip it’s from family, they all but rocket into action. They shut down the whole ride, and not only did they get the scarf out of the machinery, they blow-dried it for us so she could wear it again. It was freaking remarkable.

People in Japan are hella nice, yo. It meant a lot then, and even 5 years later, it still means a lot now. 

hornedchick:

antibig:

Mokamvilias in Greece

Beautiful! I want to be here right now, instead of the cold, rainy Midwest.

justonehiddles:

swingsetindecember:

tennants-hair:

asgard’s next top model

if loki tripped into an asgardian garbage can, this would be mean girls

i will never not reblog this 

maptitude1:

This world map in coins is made by Bedow; each continent is represented by coins from its own countries.

fdelopera:

“‘Erik,’ I cried, ‘show me your face without fear. I swear to you that you are the most sorrowful and the most sublime of men, and if Christine Daaé should henceforth tremble upon seeing you, it is because she shall be thinking of the splendor of your genius!’
“Then Erik turned around, for he believed me, and I too, alas!… I had faith in myself… He raised his skeletal hands towards Destiny, and he fell to his knees before me with words of love…
“…With words of love in his dead mouth … and the music had stopped…
“He kissed the hem of my dress; he did not see that I had closed my eyes.”
— The Phantom of the Opera, by Gaston Leroux (translated by Caitlin Freeman)

fdelopera:

“‘Erik,’ I cried, ‘show me your face without fear. I swear to you that you are the most sorrowful and the most sublime of men, and if Christine Daaé should henceforth tremble upon seeing you, it is because she shall be thinking of the splendor of your genius!’

“Then Erik turned around, for he believed me, and I too, alas!… I had faith in myself… He raised his skeletal hands towards Destiny, and he fell to his knees before me with words of love…

“…With words of love in his dead mouth … and the music had stopped…

“He kissed the hem of my dress; he did not see that I had closed my eyes.”

The Phantom of the Opera, by Gaston Leroux (translated by Caitlin Freeman)

"You’re better than I was at your age, and by a long way. And if you keep working hard, you’ll be the best bounty hunter this galaxy has ever seen."